About Jesse

Jesse Tatum currently serves as Principal Flute of The Santa Fe Symphony. She is also Principal Flute of the Opera Southwest Orchestra and a Principal Player at Chatter, an innovative Albuquerque-based chamber ensemble. Additionally, she has performed with numerous other musical organizations including The Santa Fe Opera, Performance Santa Fe, the New Mexico Philharmonic, and the El Paso Symphony. She attended the Catania International Music Festival and was a member of the National Repertory Orchestra. Jesse studied at the San Francisco Conservatory of Music and the University of New Mexico.

As a soloist, Jesse was a prizewinner at the 2014 Myrna Brown Artist competition, performed at the Currents International New Media Festival, and has appeared as a soloist with the Albuquerque Philharmonic. Her solo debut with The Santa Fe Symphony was in 2016. In 2017, Jesse was a regularly featured performer at the world-renowned Meow Wolf, an immersive art installation in Santa Fe. She was also a featured performer at the 2017 TEDxABQ conference, and a solo performer with the 2017 Gatas y Vatas Festival.

Jesse has collaborated with many composers and participated in numerous world, US, and New Mexico premieres of solo, chamber, orchestra and opera works. She has been a Featured Performer of Powell Flutes, and served multiple times as a Newly Published Music judge for the National Flute Association.

Also a Licensed Masters Social Worker, Jesse has lectured at the collegiate level on Music Performance Anxiety, and has served as the referral mental health therapist of the Santa Fe Opera. Her writings have been published in Flute Talk magazine. Jesse endeavors to bring the social work values of collaboration and authenticity to her work as a flutist.

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Brahms, Grieg & Liszt

SUNDAY, JANUARY 21, 2018
4:00 PM AT THE LENSIC

The Symphony rings in the New Year with the full orchestra under the baton of Maestro Guillermo Figueroa and a spectacular program featuring works by three of our most celebrated composers. Brahms’s shortest symphony, his No. 3, encapsulates Brahms’s motto “Free but happy” with an intricately crafted work one critic called Brahms’s “artistically the most nearly perfect” composition. The programmatic theatricality continues with Grieg’s first Peer Gynt suite, music composed to accompany Ibsen’s masterwork play, combining Norwegian folklore and traditional music with the yearning harmonies of Scandinavian Romanticism. Finally, Liszt’s Les préludes, the first “symphonic poem” ever to be published under that description, which depicts themes as universal as “love” and “victory.”

Brahms, Grieg & Liszt