Praised by The Santa Fe New Mexican for his “fluid phrases, rich focused tone, rhythmic precision, and spot-on intonation,” Violinist David Felberg, an Albuquerque native, is Concertmaster of The Santa Fe Symphony and Associate Concertmaster of the New Mexico Philharmonic, and also performs with Santa Fe Pro Musica. He is also the Artistic Director and Co-Founder of Chatter, a groundbreaking series, exploring both new and old music, that produces more than 60 performances a year. Chatter was recently mentioned in The New York Times in an article about curated silence, one of the main features of their performances. David plays in, and conducts, many of the shows—often premiering 20th- and 21st-century pieces of music that have never before been heard in New Mexico. He also directs New Music New Mexico, the contemporary ensemble at the University of New Mexico.

David has been featured soloist with The Santa Fe Symphony Orchestra, New Mexico Philharmonic, New Mexico Symphony, Albuquerque Philharmonic, Los Alamos Symphony, Palo Alto Philharmonic, Balcones Orchestra and the Chatter Orchestra. He has performed recitals and chamber music all over New Mexico and the Southwest, and most recently has performed at the Oregon Bach Festival. David also specializes in contemporary solo violin music, having performed solo works of Berio, Boulez, Sciarrino, John Zorn and Luigi Nono.

As a conductor, David regularly conducts the New Mexico Philharmonic, The Santa Fe Symphony and Chatter, and has collaborated with such soloists as Rachel Barton Pine, Conor Hanick and Benjamin Hochman. David . He received a Bachelor of Arts degree in History from the University of Arizona and a Master of Music degree in Conducting from the University of New Mexico, and has taken advanced string quartet studies at the University of Colorado with the Takacs Quartet. David has also attended the prestigious American Academy of Conducting at the Aspen Music Festival.

David plays an 1829 J. B. Vuillaume violin and uses a c. 1830 Claude Joseph Fonclause violin bow.